alt
alt
Berlin
alt
Berlin Art at Site www.berlinkunst.info John Chamberlain	Turm von Klythie
Artist:
Title:
Year:
Adress:
Website:
John Chamberlain
Turm von Klythie
1995
Friedrichstadtpassagen
Website
www.artatsite.com:
Shape
A monumental rectangular shape appears to be composed of car wrecks. This artwork by Camberlain is playing with ideas of eternity and transience.

Material
The artwork was made by a machine that compresses wrecks. The result is a work with a horizontal segmentation, with almost at random color combinations. Perhaps Camberlain is expressing ideas about the role of the artist and the creation of art also in a utilitarian situation.

Location
The attendance in a luxury department store are in continuous contact with the giant artwork. There is a great contrast between the luxury goods and the raw material for the artwork.

Meaning
I suspect Camberlain having fun playing with a large number of inconsistencies, without the intention to say much about it.

Compared with other works
Suspicion and anxiety come to me at the work Airplane Part by Nancy Rubin (Los Angeles, picture 1, more information) which is a kind of plane made of old airplane parts.

In Reflections From Sky, Helidon Xhixha (Milan, picture 2, more information) disrupts a shiny surface, the area is on a special reflected in the artwork and reflections and distortions occur in the area.

The role of vanity in our finite lives is made clear by Gino de Dominicis in his Calamita Cosmica (Milan, picture 3, more information) on a humorous way. (Reclycling of) everyday objects play an important role in the work of Suboth Gupta (Shanghai, picture 4, more information) and in this work this appear to be an essential necessity of life. Pots and pans flow out a mug like the water.
at at site
at at site
at at site
at at site
Picture 1
Picture 2
Picture 3
Picture 4

www.luise-berlin.de
John Chamberlain (* 1927) schuf 1994/95 die 11 m hohe, über 2 Etagen reichende Installation, die auf einem etwa 1 m hohen schwarzen Sockel aus lackierten und verchromten Autoblechen steht. Laut nebenstehender Erklärung ist die Skulptur „von einer Blütenhaube gekrönt“. Die Plastik korrespondiert mit der kubistischen Architektur des von Oswald Mathias Ungers (* 1926) gebauten Quartiers 205. Sie betont die Höhe und innere Gliederung des Raumes. Laut Info-Kubus reflektiert der Turm auf „abstrakte expressionistische und popartige Weise die Produktionszusammenhänge der industriellen Realität: Erfindung, Herstellung und Zerstörung, Konstruktion und Destruktion“. Der Turm in dem glasüberdachten Atrium ragt weit in die Erdgeschoßzone mit den galerieartig umlaufenden Geschäften hinein und beginnt im Untergeschoß. Er ist von einem kleinen Restaurant mit offener Theke und den Läden dahinter umgeben.
Translation:
www.luise-berlin.de
John Chamberlain ( * 1927) created in 1994/95 the 11 m high , reaching over 2 floors installation , which stands on an approximately 1 m high black base made of painted and chromed car plates. According to the adjacent declaration the sculpture is " a flower bonnet crowned ". The plastic corresponds to the cubist architecture of Oswald Mathias Ungers ( born 1926 ) built district 205. They emphasized the level and structure of the internal space. According to Info - cube reflects the tower to " Abstract Expressionistic and popartige , the production contexts of industrial reality : invention , manufacture and destruction , construction and destruction ". The tower in the glass-roofed atrium extends far into the ground-floor area with the gallery -like revolving shops and starts in the basement. He is surrounded by a small restaurant with an open bar and the shops behind.

www.wikipedia.org:
Chamberlain is best known for creating sculptures from old automobiles (or parts of) that bring the Abstract Expressionist style of painting into three dimensions. He began by carving and modelling, but turned to working in metal in 1952 and welding 1953. By 1957, while staying with the painter Larry Rivers in Southampton, New York, he began to include scrap metal from cars with his sculpture Shortstop, and from 1959 onward he concentrated on sculpture built entirely of crushed automobile parts welded together. By the end of the 1960s, Chamberlain had replaced his signature materials initially with galvanized steel, then with mineral-coated Plexiglas, and finally with aluminum foil. In 1966, he began a series of sculptures made of rolled, folded, and tied urethane foam. Since returning in the mid-1970s to metal as his primary material, Chamberlain has limited himself to specific parts of the automobile (fenders, bumpers, or the chassis, for example). In 1973, two 300-pound metal pieces by Chamberlain were mistaken for junk and carted away as they sat outside a gallery warehouse in Chicago.
In the early 1980s, Chamberlain moved to Sarasota, Florida, where an 18,000-square-foot warehouse studio on Cocoanut Avenue enabled him to work on a much grander scale than he previously had. Many of the subsequent works Chamberlain made in Florida revert to more volumetric, compact configurations, often aligned on a vertical axis. As seen in the so-called Giraffe series (circa 1982–83), for example, linear patterns cavort over multicolored surfaces—the results of sandblasting the metal, removing the paint, and exposing the raw surface beneath. In 1984, Chamberlain created the monumental American Tableau created for display on the Seagram Building's plaza.
Chamberlain also made abstract colour paintings from 1963, and from 1967 he made several films, such as "Wide Point" (1968) and “The Secret Life of Hernando Cortez,” filmed in Mexico with Warhol regulars Taylor Mead and Ultra Violet. In the last decade of his life, the artist expanded his work to large-format photographs.
In the early 1980s, Chamberlain moved to Sarasota, Florida, where an 18,000-square-foot warehouse studio on Cocoanut Avenue enabled him to work on a much grander scale than he previously had. Many of the subsequent works Chamberlain made in Florida revert to more volumetric, compact configurations, often aligned on a vertical axis. As seen in the so-called Giraffe series (circa 1982–83), for example, linear patterns cavort over multicolored surfaces—the results of sandblasting the metal, removing the paint, and exposing the raw surface beneath. In 1984, Chamberlain created the monumental American Tableau created for display on the Seagram Building's plaza.
Chamberlain also made abstract colour paintings from 1963, and from 1967 he made several films, such as "Wide Point" (1968) and “The Secret Life of Hernando Cortez,” filmed in Mexico with Warhol regulars Taylor Mead and Ultra Violet. In the last decade of his life, the artist expanded his work to large-format photographs.